AACTA Member Spotlight: Jessica Hobbs – Director

Jessica Hobs on set

Jessica Hobbs on set DEVIL’S DUST, photograph by Matt Temple

Jessica Hobbs is the director of many hours of groundbreaking, heart-stopping Australian television dramas, and though she grew up in New Zealand, we’re very happy to claim her as one of our own.

First inspired to work in drama, at age fourteen, when she saw Zeffirelli’s interpretation of the great tragedy Romeo and Juliet, Hobbs has gone on to perfect the art of empathetic, honest and affecting direction: from her early work on Heartbreak High through to THAT episode of Love My Way and her most recent outings on Curtin, Spirited, Tangle, My Place and the incredibly popular and AACTA Award-winning television adaptation of The Slap.

Over the years, Jessica Hobbs has won numerous AFI | AACTA Awards for Best Direction in Television and Short Film.* The Slap has also recently been nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best International Television Series. She is currently working on a two part telemovie Devil’s Dust for ABC TV. Spanning the 1970’s to the 2000’s, Devils Dust is a political thriller that deals with asbestos victim Bernie Banton and his courageous fight against James Hardie Industries.

Despite her wonderful credit list and ever-growing stash of nominations and awards, Hobbs still confesses to the odd moment of self-doubt, but believes the key to getting through is to retain your sense of humour, particularly when things don’t go according to plan.

In this interview, Jessica Hobbs talks about the particular challenges and advantages of working in the television medium. She shares her insight into eliciting the best performances from actors, and talks about the importance of a great script. Hobbs is generous with her praise for those who gave her a start and mentored her early steps in the industry and, in turn, she offers some advice for young directors just starting out.

Jessica Hobbs is one of our newly anointed Honorary Councillors for the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) within the Direction Chapter. We are proud to have film and television makers of this calibre as a part of the new Australian Academy. In coming months, we look forward to sharing more of these profiles as we turn the Member Spotlight onto more performers and practitioners – both those working at home and abroad.

AFI | AACTA: You grew up in New Zealand. What was your educational path towards directing as a career – and directing in Australia?

Jessica Hobbs: I always had a strong interest in theatre and film but I didn’t know that directing was an actual career when I was younger. I do remember being shown Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet at school when I was 14 and wondering who it was that got to create that world. But the idea of it as a proper job, as a career, that only occurred to me a few years later.

AFI | AACTA: Was directing something you always wanted to do, or a career which you fell into?

Jessica Hobbs: I decided when I was about 19 that I’d like to direct but it was a long time before I felt brave enough to tell people that that was my dream. I started working in the film industry in New Zealand at 21 as an assistant director and then a year or so later, I started making short films.  I spent many years working as an AD (Assistant Director) while trying to develop my directing skills. It wasn’t until my late twenties that I started directing full time when Ben Gannon gave me my first big break, directing Heartbreak High. I spent two years directing on the show and it became a bit like a mini film school for me. Every six weeks, I’d get another two hours of story to work on. I loved the directorial process they had on that show. For television at that time, they gave the directors a huge amount of creative freedom.

Jess Hobbs onset DEVIL'S DUST, photograph by Matt Temple

Jess on set DEVIL’S DUST, photograph by Matt Temple

AFI | AACTA: You’ve directed numerous television dramas – from Heartbreak High, Love My Way, Tangle and Spirited, to My Place and The Slap. What is it about directing television dramas that particularly appeals to you? What do enjoy least about it?

Jessica Hobbs: I love directing television and I feel that we’ve been very privileged over the last few years to see a big renaissance in the way that television is made. Television allows you the freedom to explore character development and story structure in greater depth over a longer period of time.

The less positive side of working in television is that it is always a race against time and budget constraints. But, I also see friends who are filmmakers having very similar struggles so perhaps the tyranny of trying to balance creativity and economic realities is across both mediums.

AFI | AACTA: In many of the aforementioned series, the characters and storylines are layered, complex and complicated. They often deal sensitively with fraught emotions or the personal intricacies of life’s ups and downs. I can imagine that this sort of subject matter could be quite difficult to direct. How do you go about getting such honest performances out of your actors?

Jessica Hobbs: I spend as much time as possible talking with them about the story and what we are trying to convey to the audience. Then, we break that down into what they feel it is that their characters want and how they are going to go about getting that.

Every actor uses a different methodology to perform. It’s important that I try to understand their way of working so that we can make the most of our time together. Ultimately, it is the actor who is up there on the screen, not the director, so it’s a big process of trust and giving them the freedom and space to try different things.

AFI | AACTA: In my opinion, you were responsible for directing one of the most moving pieces of Australian television history – that heartbreaking, earth shattering moment in Love My Way [spoiler alert!] when Frankie and Charlie’s world is turned upside down with the death of their only daughter. This moment in the series still resonates with its audience to this day. What for you were the most important elements in being able to do justice to such grief onscreen?

Jessica Hobbs: That was a beautifully developed moment by the writers before I even started the directing process. They had the guts to tell the story in that way and to stick with their idea that Lou’s death was just something that happened out of the blue. There would be no accident, no one to blame. In many ways, that spontaneity freed up my directing and made me conscious that I had to try and keep it very simple and real. It needed to feel like it was a real time experience and I think that’s why it made such an impact for the viewers.

Jess with Essie Davis onset of THE SLAP, photograph by Ben King

Jess with Essie Davis (Anouk) onset of THE SLAP, photograph by Ben King

AFI | AACTA: You recently directed two episodes (‘Anouk’ and ‘Hector’) of the popular Australian mini-series, adapted from the book of the same name, The Slap.  Did you choose to direct these particular episodes/character profiles? If so, why?

Jessica Hobbs: I can be honest now and say yes, I definitely chose Anouk but I initially tried to avoid the Hector episode – [producer] Tony Ayres corralled me into it so I blame him! It wasn’t that I didn’t like the Hector episode just that quite frankly it terrified me.  It was the opening episode of the series and it involved introducing all of the characters and the drama surrounding the slap, itself. I kept trying to off load the episode onto other directors but to no avail. In hindsight, I’m glad Tony pushed me towards it. The project was a fantastic opportunity to collaborate with a brilliant team of directors: Matt Saville, Rob Connolly and Tony Ayres.

AFI | AACTA: You were nominated for your first AFI Award in 2004 (Best Short Fiction Film – So Close to Home) and since then, have twice won the AFI Award for Best Direction in Television – in 2005 for Love My Way, and in 2006 for the two-part drama series about the invasion of East Timor, Answered by Fire. Last year, you were nominated again for the newly named AACTA Award for Best Direction in Television for The Slap. How does it feel and what has it done for your career to be nominated and win these Awards for your craft?

Jessica Hobbs: It was a great sensation to win those AFI awards. It does give you a wonderful feeling of peer recognition. I was immensely proud of both those projects so it was delightful to get the awards. Winning an AFI, or an AACTA as they are now known gave me confidence in my directing style and encouraged me to take more risks in choosing future projects.

Jess with her 2006 AFI Award for Best Direction in Television for ANSWERED BY FIRE

AFI | AACTA: The Slap has just been nominated for a BAFTA Award. Does international recognition feel especially gratifying?

Jessica Hobbs: Well, yes! I think for all of us on The Slap team, it’s been amazing seeing the program being so well received internationally. It has also begun to open up work opportunities for us in the UK.

AFI | AACTA: What have been some of the biggest challenges you’ve faced during your career?

Jessica Hobbs: Trying to keep my sense of humour and not become crippled by self-doubt. I guess it is all part of the normal creative process but it can be very hard to cope with at times. Some things work brilliantly and others just don’t. I am finding that managing my emotional responses to all of that is a life long learning process, a bit of an emotional roller coaster.

AFI | AACTA: Is it difficult to maintain a work/life balance as a television director?

Jessica Hobbs: Yes, but I love the work and feel privileged to be able to do it. My children have a more mixed reaction to it but I’m trying to find a better balance for them.

Jess onset of THE SLAP, photograph by Ben King

Jess on set of THE SLAP, photograph by Ben King

AFI | AACTA: Which part of your job gives you the most joy?

Jessica Hobbs: The creative collaboration with writers, producers, actors, designers, cinematographers, editors – creative collaboration is the best part of the job for me. I adore working with people who push you to produce better work and open you up to all sorts of creative possibilities.

AFI | AACTA: Are there still particular challenges for women in the directing profession? Is there any advice you would give young women trying to get started?

Jessica Hobbs: I think the industry is very open to female directors now. My advice would be the same for anyone, both women and men, look at work that you like and try to work with the teams of people who have made the shows/films that you admire and keep doing your own work.

AFI | AACTA: Are you able to name three mentors who have significantly helped you or influenced you?

Jessica Hobbs: Ben Gannon gave me my first big break and a great piece of advice when I was starting out. He said that if I told the story well then he’d give me more episodes to direct. If it looked great but I didn’t tell the story well then that would be the end of it.

Meeting John Edwards, Claudia Karvan and Jacqueline Perske who all gave me the opportunity to direct Love My Way was momentous for my career. Those three people have had a significant and very positive affect on my directing work.

And Scott Meek [producer and former ABC Head of Drama] is a wonderful mentor to me and has been for many years.

AFI | AACTA: What is your all time favourite Australian film or television program? Why?

Jessica Hobbs: Oh god – picking one?!
Blue Murder for the effect it had on me when I first watched it. I had only just moved to Australia and was mesmerised by it. In terms of features, I still think it would be the experience of watching Samson and Delilah. I sat in the dark and watched in awe.

AFI | AACTA: Thanks for your sharing your time with us.

* AFI |AACTA Award Nominations and Wins:

2004 AFI Award for Best Short Fiction Film – Nomination
So Close To Home
2005 Won AFI Award for Best Direction in Television
Love My Way, Series 1 – Episode 8, ‘A Different Planet’ (Foxtel)
2006 Won AFI Award for Best Direction in Television
Answered By Fire (ABC)
2011 AACTA Award for Best Direction in Television – Nomination
The Slap – Episode 1, ‘Hector’ (ABC1)
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Focus on the Television Nominees: Part 1 – Best Television Drama Series & Best Telefeature, Mini Series or Short Run Series

Did you know that the inaugural Samsung AACTA Awards marks the 25th year in which the AFI | AACTA has awarded excellence in television categories? Television Awards were first given out in 1986. No nominees were annouced that year, but winners were announced in ten categories around Mini Series and Telefeatures.

Fast forward to 2011/2012, and we have nominees in 13 television categories. These include Children’s Television Series, Comedy Series, Light Entertainment and of course Television Drama and Telefeature, Mini Series or Short Run Series.

You can see full listings of the nominees over on the AACTA website, but in the lead up to the AACTA Awards in January, we’re writing a two-part piece to provide you with insights and further reading on the high quality of our television drama nominees. In this post, we look at the nominees in the Best Television Drama Series and Best Telefeature, Mini Series and Short Run Series, and I’m sure you’ll agree, it’s been a great year for Australian drama on the small screen.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES

And the nominees are:

East West 101, Season 3The Heroes’ Journey. Steve Knapman, Kris Wyld. SBS
Offspring, Season 2. John Edwards, Imogen Banks. Network Ten
Rake. Ian Collie, Peter Duncan, Richard Roxburgh. ABC1
Spirited, Season 2. Claudia Karvan, Jacquelin Perske. FOXTEL – W

In this category, for which the producers accept the Award, we have four strong contenders. East West 101, the tense SBS cop drama set in multicultural Sydney, won this Award back in 2009. Producers Steve Knapman and Kris Wyld have had great success in the crime and cop genres over the years, beginning their work as a writing/producing team with their acclaimed ABC drama series Wildside (1997-99). You can read more at the Knapman Wyld Television website.

Offspring, Season 2, the Network Ten romantic drama which has become appointment viewing has in the opinions of many, proved to be even stronger in its second season. Last year, Deborah Mailman won an AFI Award  for Best Supporting Actress in a Television Drama for her role as the bubbly Cherie, while John Waters was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in a Television Drama for his part as the lothario Proudman patriarch. This year, the series itself is nominated with producers John Edwards and Imogen Banks up for the Award. John Edwards, of Southern Star Entertainment, has been responsible for numerous AFI Award winning television dramas including The Secret Life of Us, Marking Time, Love My Way, Tangle, Rush and many more. Read more about Edwards here. Imogen Banks has been twice nominated for AFI Awards alongside Edwards:  for her work on Tangle (2010) and Dangerous (2007).

Rake, the witty and hilarious ABC1 series about a rascally and rogueish criminal barrister (played by Richard Roxburgh), is a strong contender, with its fearless lead character and wicked plotlines. The series was created by Roxburgh, Charles Waterstreet and Peter Duncan (Children of the Revolution, Unfinished Sky)  – and Duncan was also co-producer with Ian Collie, co-writer with Andrew Knight, and director of two episodes. You can read Encore’s on-set interview with Collie and Duncan here.

Spirited, a supernatural romantic comedy, screened on Foxtel’s W channel, sees leading lady and producer Claudia Karvan, along with co-writer and producer Jacquelin Perske up for the Award for this second series. They’re two women quite familiar with winning AFI Awards, having collected a swathe of them for their acclaimed drama series Love My Way (a show that was nominated for 18 AFI Awards and won eight over its three series). News that Spirited has just been renewed for a third series has the show’s ardent fans cheering. Visit the show’s official website here.

AACTA AWARD FOR BEST TELEFEATURE, MINI SERIES OR SHORT RUN SERIES


And the nominees are:

Cloudstreet. Greg Haddrick, Brenda Pam. FOXTEL – Showcase
Paper Giants: The Birth Of Cleo. John Edwards, Karen Radzyner. ABC1
Sisters Of War. Andrew Wiseman. ABC1
The Slap. Tony Ayres, Helen Bowden, Michael McMahon. ABC1

Cloudstreet, Foxtel’s beautiful three-part mini series based on Tim Winton’s beloved book, is up against three ABC productions in this category. Producers Greg Haddrick (Head of Drama for Screentime) and Brenda Pam have previously collaborated on Underbelly: A Tale of Two Cities, and Haddrick is a three-time AFI Award winner and an accomplished screenwriter (MDA, Underbelly). With a talented and cohesive ensemble cast (wonderful casting by Mullinars), and superb production values, Cloudstreet is nominated for a total of eight AACTA Awards and is destined for a long life on DVD and blu-ray and will be in many a Christmas stocking this year. Check out the official website here.

The two-part Paper Giants: The Birth of Cleo was a surprise hit on the ABC when it screened in April this year. The true tale of a brave young editor, Ita Buttrose (Asher Keddie) at the helm of Australia’s sexual revolution with Cleo, the magazine that reflected new freedom for women also featured a pitch perfect performance by Rob Carlton as a youthful Kerry Packer. (Both Keddie and Carlton are nominated for their performances in this production). Prolific producer John Edwards (see Offspring above) has a hand in this one too. To explore the show more, visit the official website here.

Sisters of War, the 97-minute telefeature first screened on ABC1 in November 2010, is based on the true story and war diaries of a nurse and a nun held prisoner of war by the Japanese in Papua New Guinea in 1942. Starring Sarah Snook, Claire van der Boom and Susie Porter, this is a story about women in extreme circumstances, and their extraordinary courage and will to prevail. (Snook and Porter are nominated for their work here, but more on that in a future blog post.) Sisters of War was written by John Misto (Days of the Roses, The Damnation of Harvey McHugh), directed by Brendan Maher (The Road From Coorain, After The Deluge) and produced by Andrew Wiseman. Wiseman, up for this AACTA Award, has previously been nominated for a number of AFI Awards, and has won twice (My Brother Jack, After the Deluge). Screenhub‘s interview with Wiseman can be found here.

The eight-part short run series The Slap, up for a total of  eight AACTA Awards, managed to be ‘watercooler television’, in the same way that the original novel by Christos Tsiolkas was a ‘BBQ stopper’ and book club favourite. In this Award category, the nominees are producers Tony Ayres, Helen Bowden and Michael McMahon, who are partners in the prolific local production company Matchbox Pictures (along with fellow producers Penny Chapman and Helen Pankhurst). Michael McMahon has won an AFI Award previously, for Best Documentary (Wildness, 2003) and was nominated for Best Film for The Home Song Stories, in 2007. Helen Bowden has also been nominated twice before, for Best Film (Soft Fruit, 1999) and Best Documentary (Girl in a Mirror, 2005). Tony Ayres is a writer and director as well as a producer (he directed two episodes of The Slap – ‘Richie’ and ‘Manolis’) and won two AFI Awards in 2007 for his semi autobiographical feature film The Home Song Stories. Find out more about Matchbox Pictures at their website.

The winners of the AACTA Awards for Best Television Drama Series and Best Telefeature, Mini Series or Short Run Series will be announced at the inaugural Samsung AACTA Awards Ceremony on Tuesday 31 January 2012 and broadcast on the Nine Network. Stay tuned for our post next week covering the nominees for Best Direction in Television, Best Screenplay in Television, Best Lead Actor and Actress in Television Drama, and Best Guest or Supporting Actor and Actress in Television Drama.

Why I Adore: Adaptations

by Popzilla

Cloudstreet Poster

The eagerly awaited 6-part adaptation of 'Cloudstreet' premieres on Foxtel's Showcase this Sunday, 22 May, at 8.30pm.

As much as I’m a film nut, I’m also a book nut. So when both media are awesomely combined – I’m as happy as a ham in mud.

I have to admit, I probably discovered books before I discovered film. But some of my most vivid child and teen memories arise from not only the musky damp comfort of books, but also the thrill of seeing them come to life on screen – through film adaptations.

Theatre works, comic books, games, pop-fiction novels, classical adaptations – I’m there. I might love it, I might hate it , but I appreciate the efforts involved in every little detail, to bring much loved, pop-culture adventures, or undiscovered tales to big or small screens.

Through  written stories, we discover (quite often in GREAT detail), heart rending family sagas (Cloudstreet; The Slap, Our Father Who Art in the Tree), quirky coming of age kerfuffles, seedy criminal underworlds (Truth), and even classic  poems  (The Man from Snowy River).

Great stories are already awash with all the colours and sounds of ‘the big screen’. So what happens when novels are translated onto big or small screens? There is a moment where you’re about to take a gamble –  into the cinema, or say, reserving a quiet weekend to open the first page of a novel just watched on the big screen… when some of us take a big pensive breath and say… “um, should I really be doing this?”

Will we love the film version just as much if characters are removed; plots changed and (gasp!) endings completely re-written? In speaking with friends, family, filmmakers, and some cranky librarians, I have found that not everyone immediately jumps for joy at the mention of an adaptation. No – quite the opposite.

There are literary purists who immediately promise to stay ‘true’ to the author’, to never forsake the written word for the big screen version. Not even choc-tops can lure them away from their musty pages. There are others who are bitterly disappointed in ‘crude adaptations’, and the impact the screen sometimes takes on a good story. And then there are those (just like me) who love the opportunity to see a story brought to the big screen. To revel in the backdrops, the little details, and even the changes that are evident in adaptations.

It’s kind of ridiculous I guess, but sometimes I also wonder about the correct order – whether I should be seeing a film before I read it the book it’s based on, or afterwards! Many a book has no doubt been improved by its film adaptation, not to mention the sudden increase in book sales. Film adaptations can quite often bring hidden novel gems to mainstream masses – something that has been hiding on dusty shelves just waiting for the chance to come to life.

And, yes, some books have been ruined by screen adaptation. Whether it’s overzealous screenwriters, directors, bossy-pants authors or badly cast actors – who knows who is to blame? Converting a book into film is a tricky business. Firstly – you have to secure the rights to the novel – and the cost ranges for script and development can be much higher than those associated with filming an original screenplay.

However, it must be said that adaptations can also raise books, games and comics to new heights – creating brand new interpretations (and new BRAND interpretations), even adding further value to a story… or film.

There’s also the question of what happens to the screenwriter after all the writing is  completed. Have they written themselves off the page and out of the film? (An interesting interview with screenwriter John Collee  (Happy Feet, Master and Commander) sheds some light on Collee’s screenwriting experiences in the biz.)

In honor of writers, screenwriters, and filmmakers everywhere, and to illustrate how wonderful they can be – here are (in no particular order) my ‘adored’ Australian film adaptations:

Puberty Blues

“You wanna go down the dunnies for a smoke?”

I love the teen awkwardness that is captured in this film, and the snapshot of 80s Cronulla. Based on the book by Gabrielle Carey and Kathy Lette – not all of the book made it to the screen, but it is an absolute screen gem. And who could forget the theme song?

Picnic At Hanging Rock

It’s spooky, it’s kooky –just like the book, if not better! The BAFTA award-winning Peter Weir adaptation of the book by Joan Lindsay is still loved today. Just go to Hanging  Rock to hear Swedish backpackers yell ‘Miranda!!’ from the haunted peaks…

Oscar and Lucinda

A glass church. A GLASS CHURCH! I still can’t believe Gillian Armstrong mastered this complex and imaginary tale whilst auditioning Cate Blanchett for the world screen. And the chemistry between Ralph Finnes and Blanchett set the pages of this Peter Carey novel on FIRE!

 Romulus, My Father


Everyone is heartbreakingly beautiful in this AFI Award winning film adaptation of the book by Raimond Gaita. With the screen adaptation written by British poet Nick Drake, stunningly filmed by Shine cinematographer Geoffrey Simpson, and an impressive directorial debut by Richard Roxburgh, even the author himself saw the film more than 20 times…

Playing Beatie Bow

Australia’s version of Labyrinth with kids instead of goblins. Adapted from the Ruth Park novel of the same name, I’m just hanging out for a film on Park to come out one of these days…

Praise

I just love it. The performances, mood and feel of John Curran’s 1999 movie completely match that of the book by Andrew McGahan.

http://www.traileraddict.com/trailer/praise/trailer

He Died With A Falafel In His Hand


I know a lot of people who have yet to warm to this early 2000 flick. But for me, it captures so many true-to-life tales of share-house living, and has one hell of a kick-ass soundtrack. Noah Taylor is the bees-knees as a depressed and down and out writer living on the dole.

My Brother Jack

Some heartbreaking moments in this AFI Award Winning production starring Matt Day, Claudia Karvan, William McInnes and Jack Thompson. A 2001 made-for-television adaptation of George Johnson’s classic novel.

ADAPTATION AUSSIE!

Here are some upcoming adaptations to watch out for:

 Cloudstreet


I’m already taken in by the trailer! Written for the small screen by the author himself, alongside co-screenwriter Ellen Fontana.

Cloudstreet premieres on the Foxtel channel Showcase on Sunday, May 22 2011, 8.30pm.

The Slap

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1823011/

An eight part ABC television series adaptation of the bestseller by Christos Tsiolkas is to star a stellar lineup including Brendan Cowell, , Melissa George, Alex Dimitriades, Sophie Lowe, Jonathan LaPaglia and more.

Red Dog

The story of Red Dog is a well-known WA legend but it was popularised by English author Louis de Bernieres in his book of the same name.

The film adaptation directed by Kriv Stenders is based on the legendary true story of the Red Dog who united a disparate local mining community while roaming the Australian outback in search of his long-lost master

.Starring Josh LucasRachael TaylorNoah Taylor, Luke Ford and Bill Hunter with release set for August 2011.

Oranges and Sunshine


Based on the true story by UK social worker Margaret Humphreys about her expose of the scandal of Britain’s forgotten and abused child migrants (previously published as Empty Cradles), Oranges and Sunshine stars Hugo Weaving, David Wenham and Emily Watson. Set for release in Australia in June 2011.

LBF

http://www.lbfthefilm.com/

LBF is a ‘pop art film’ based on the novel Living Between F***ks by Cry Bloxsome from which it draws much of its wry narration. Paris-based writer Goodchild (Toby Schmitz) returns to Sydney for the funeral of his ex-girlfriend l and steadily veers off the rails. Starring Gracie Otto, Septimus Caton and Australian model April Rose Pengilly, the film also has a very cool little soundtrack featuring aussie bands Boy & Bear and Operator Please. Premiering at the 2011 Sydney Film Festival.

The Telegram Man

 http://www.thetelegramman.com/

Based on a short story by John Boyne, the award-winning author of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. Set in Australia, The Telegram Man is short film with a mega cast including Gary Sweet and Sigrid Thornton,and will be actor Jack Thompson’s first short film acting debut. Currently in post production and coming soon to a Film Festival near you in 2011.

Adaptation Websites

More? The story doesn’t end here folks…

Australian Adaptations

http://www.middlemiss.org/matilda/film-adaptations/

50 Upcoming Book-to-Movie Adaptations

http://www.nextmovie.com/blog/upcoming-book-adaptations/

Film of the Book: Top 50 Adaptations

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2006/apr/19/film.books

UK paper The Guardian provides a list of Top 50  usual suspects.

Top Grossing Film Adaptations

As declared by Forbes – there’s billions in the books!

http://au.pfinance.yahoo.com/special-features/top-gross-film-adaptations/index.html

From Page to Screen

Four part article written on worldwide adaptations – successful, unsuccessful and upcoming.

http://www.digitalfie.com/1466-from-page-to-screen-part-4-books-yet-to-be-filmed

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Do you know of any upcoming adaptations with Aussies in them?

Be sure to post below!

Also keen to know your own top 5 Australian adaptations…