AACTA Member Spotlight: Matthew Moore – Actor, Writer, Director

Matthew Moore

Actor, writer and director Matthew Moore

Matthew Moore caught the acting bug at the tender age of 11 when he reenacted Burke and Wills’ journey across Australia for his Year five class. Since then, he’s honed his craft by studying at WAAPA and scoring a supporting role in The Dish, thanks to his exceptional graduation performance. Over the years, Moore has worked across film, television and theatre, acting in everything from Home and Away, All Saints and Rake to The Dish and Burning Man. He claims his meatier rolls have come straight from the great bard himself, Shakespeare, but that the most fun he’s had was playing Jodee in Rob Carlton’s entertaining TV drama, Chandon Pictures.

Julian Poster

In what seems to have been a natural progression for Moore and his filmmaking talents, he has recently turned his hand towards writing and directing for the screen with his imaginative new short film, Julian. This shift to behind the camera appears to have paid off. Julian has recently earned Moore the Flickerfest Special Jury Prize for Best Short Film and the Crystal Bear Generation K+ at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival in February. He claims the key to creative success is simply not being afraid to create, of taking a good idea and making it into something tangible. Moore thoroughly enjoyed the collaborative filmmaking process and was particularly taken with his young cast. He is now keen to pursue a career that is both in front of and behind the camera. Perhaps, once again, inspiration can be traced back to Australia’s great auteur, Peter Weir.

Matthew Moore is one of our newest AACTA members, and we’re proud to welcome such emerging filmmakers into the new Australian Academy. In coming months, we look forward to sharing more of these profiles with you as we turn the Member Spotlight onto more performers and practitioners – both those working at home and abroad.

AFI | AACTA: Where did you grow up?

Matthew Moore: I was born in Frankston, Victoria but my formative years were in Canberra. I left Canberra at age 18 for University.

AFI | AACTA: What first inspired you to become an actor?

Matthew Moore: I wanted to be an actor from a very young age. I think the inspiration came from just doing it, experiencing it. I remember having to act out Burke and Wills’ journey across Australia in Year five and thinking then that this could be my thing. I would go to the local library and flick through old acting books. I’d pore over black and white photos of Ralph Richardson or Laurence Olivier wearing an outrageous latex nose, and be blown away by their ability to transform from role to role. By early high school, I knew that I wanted to audition for drama school.  But I kept it to myself until I absolutely had to come clean to a careers advisor in Year 12. Up to that point, acting was something I had only ever explored in drama class and in annual school musicals so I was hyper-aware of how ridiculous saying I wanted to act professionally would sound. My family was ultimately very supportive of my decision.

AFI | AACTA: You studied at WAAPA and were recruited for the role of Keith Morrison in The Dish, after Jane Kennedy saw your graduation showcase performance in 1998. This must’ve been an outstanding final performance and a bit of a dream come true. Can you tell us a little bit about what it was like studying performing arts at WAAPA and then debuting in The Dish?

Matthew Moore: WAAPA was a special time for me and the work I did there still forms the foundations of my work. It prepared me for the industry. At that time, we had outstanding teachers at WAAPA such as Andrew LLoyd and Nick Enright. You’re working on your craft (voice, movement and acting) from 10am to 6pm, five days a week, and then performances on top of that, so it’s truly a vocational training. People either seem to love or hate drama school but I had a good balance of being challenged and nurtured.

Upon graduating, The Dish was my first professional gig. I had grown up listening to the D-Generation and watching The Late Show and Frontline. I was a huge fan of their (Working Dog’s) work. I remember in my first meeting with my agent, Lisa Mann, I said my dream would be to work with the guys from Working Dog. At the time, I didn’t know Jane Kennedy had seen my graduation show. A couple of weeks later, Working Dog asked me to fly down to Melbourne to meet them all and to discuss a role they had in mind for me. In hindsight, this may have set up somewhat unrealistic expectations for my next few meetings with Lisa Mann! Working on the film was as much fun as you’d expect. They are exceptional writers and have a great trust of actors.

AFI | AACTA: Since then, you have acted consistently across both film and television. Is there a significant difference to the way in which you approach these different formats? Do you prefer one to the other?

Matthew Moore: I really don’t have a preference. To be honest the majority of my work has been in the theatre. That’s where there is the most significant difference for the actor, the difference between the stage and any form of screen work. I think the joy is being able to work across stage, television and film. Each medium has different challenges and feeds you in a different way. The industry is likely to pull you in a particular direction but if you can find a balance it’s very rewarding.

AFI | AACTA: What is the meatiest role you’ve ever had?

Matthew Moore: Well the roles I would describe as ‘meaty’ would be the roles I have played in the theatre. That’s where I’ve had the opportunities to play some of the great roles in Shakespeare, Webster, Goldoni etc. In terms of film and television, I often think of what’s the most fun I’ve had. The most fun I’ve had in television was playing Jodee in Chandon Pictures, written and directed by Rob Carlton. I actually met Rob at the auditions for Chandon Pictures. I was the reader. We spent the day auditioning actors and just had a ball. He called me a week later and said he had written a role for me, playing Josh Lawson’s boss. Jodee was like a Wall Street Wolf. He was a finance man with a porche, a beautiful wife, a penchant for cocaine and happened to own a gay nightclub – only from the mind of Rob Carlton! When jobs are that fun, you just want the series to go on forever. Incidentally, it stopped at two series.

AFI | AACTA: Was turning away from acting towards writing, directing and producing your own short film a natural progression for you? How challenging and/or rewarding was this transition?

Matthew Moore: It was natural in that I’d always wanted to do it. When I was 16/17 years old I was equally interested in filmmaking and acting and made a couple of short films at the time. Then I just went down the acting path, training at WAAPA, spending years in the theatre and then on to working in film and television. By the time I looked up, more than ten years had gone by and I felt like it was time to start nurturing the filmmaking side of things again. I also felt it was important to create something myself. As an actor you are always helping to fulfill someone else’s creative vision. It’s a very healthy thing for an actor to do I think – to experience creativity from the other side and drive your own vision. I found it very empowering. It was great to work with all the different departments in a much more meaningful way. Film is so collaborative and by stepping behind the camera I really got to experience and appreciate the crew’s expertise much more.

Julian

Ed Oxenbould on the set of JULIAN

AFI |AACTA: Julian is your first short film. Where did the initial inspiration for this film come from? Was there anything in particular that you wanted to explore/capture in this film?

Matthew Moore: Before I had the idea for the film, I met Ed Oxenbould and Morgana Davies at an audition. They were both incredible little actors, both 10 years old, and I thought I’d love to make a short film with them one day, if I ever had the right idea. So, my initial inspiration was simply wanting to work with these two actors. About six months later, I had an idea for the first scene and the general conceit of the film. It was a good fit for the two of them. I won’t say what that general conceit was as there are some local festivals coming up and I’d love for people to experience the film afresh. The main idea I wanted to explore, however, was about a little boy who needs to speak his truth and identifying where that desire comes from. The original idea I’d come up with ended up becoming the icing on the cake.

AFI | AACTA: Is there a particular message that you are trying to communicate in this film or are you more interested in leaving it up to the individual to create his or her own meaning?

Matthew Moore: I think a level of ambiguity is always interesting and if you’ve managed to create discussion, I think you’ve had a win. The theme of speaking your truth is a clear one, I think, and the last line in the film gives a clue as to the side I personally lean towards. I certainly wanted the audience to follow and be with this little boy.

AFI|AACTA: Ed Oxenbould has been praised for his extremely convincing and disarming portrayal of the young Julian. Was this Ed’s first film performance?

Matthew Moore: Ed’s done some bits and pieces but he’s about to do a whole lot more. A friend of mine who is a writer saw the film, subsequently showed it to a very high profile producer and as a result Ed is about to make his debut in a new prime time TV show as a series regular. They cast him without an audition. I can’t say anymore than that at this stage. I believe it is being announced in the coming weeks. I’m thrilled for him.

Ed Oxenbould and Matthew Moore on the set of Julian

Ed Oxenbould and Matthew Moore on the set of JULIAN

AFI | AACTA: What was it like to be on the other side of the camera and to direct such a young person in this role?

Matthew Moore: Directing Ed and the other kids was really no different from directing adults. In some regards, it was easier. They are all very talented and professional. They had all been on sets before and knew the drill. They were open and available and took direction incredibly well. I think when working with kids it is important to have a very clear idea of what you want. We did have one rehearsal day, for an hour, where I got the three main kids together to run the main scene and I did have a moment that day, when I thought ‘Oh my god what was I thinking?’ The kids were sussing each other out and it was a little bit like spinning plates – one would get going and the others would lose focus. Sometimes I’d give direction and think ‘Nope, they’re not listening at all.’ But then we’d do a take and it would all be there. They were soaking everything up. Come shoot day, they were amazing. We had to move extremely quickly and they just bounced along. The best thing about Ed Oxenbould, Morgana Davies, Joseph Famularo and Will Cottle was that they are just such great people. They made the shoot fun.

AFI | AACTA: Julian has earned you the Special Jury Prize for Best Short Film at Flickerfest and more recently the Crystal Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival. How does it feel to have won these prestigious awards with your first foray into filmmaking?

Crystal Bear

Matthew Moore (centre) accepting his Crystal Bear Award at the Berlin International Film Festival with Festival Section Director Maryanne Redpath and Section Co-director Florian Weghorn

Matthew Moore: Flickerfest was the first time I saw the film on the big screen and in front of an audience. That was very rewarding in itself. Listening to people react and enjoy the film in a festival atmosphere. Flickerfest has showcased a lot of local filmmaking talent over the years, many of whom have gone on to make feature films. It was great to compete against some of those filmmakers, filmmakers I’ve admired for a long time.

The Berlin International Film Festival had always been a dream for me. In the back of my mind, I’d always wanted to have a film screen in competition there. For some reason, it was the festival, of the big four, that had captured my imagination. So, it was quite surreal to experience it. Berlin’s an incredible city for artists all year round but during the festival it’s incredible. There are so many creative types in one place: directors, producers, writers, actors, cinematographers all smashed into Potsdammer Platz together. You’ll see an amazing Dutch feature in the morning, an independent American film in the afternoon, perhaps catch a program of shorts and then meet all the creative teams that night at the bar. You’ve seen all their work and they’ve seen yours. It’s incredibly exciting. Just in the shorts section alone, I competed against films from 23 countries. It’s like the United Nations of filmmaking. Winning the Crystal Bear at the end of those 10 days was very special. The whole experience has been an eye opener, a great focuser and very inspiring.

Crystal Bear

Matthew Moore with his wife Genevieve Hegney and the Crystal Bear Award

AFI | AACTA: What have been some of the biggest challenges you’ve faced during your career? What have been the highlights? What are you most looking forward to?

Matthew Moore: There are just so many challenging aspects of the industry that you have to navigate, particularly as an actor. I think, as actors, we try to make sense of these challenging aspects when often there is no sense to be made. Personally, I find not getting the opportunity to audition for a role harder than not getting a job. If you’ve had an audition, at least you’ve been in the mix and had an opportunity to act that day. More than once, I’ve had to fight like crazy to get into a room and then ultimately won the role. In terms of other challenges, watch Fiery Hawk on YouTube. Most actors I know who’ve seen it, regardless of personal success, feel like it sums up the actors experience… and it’s funny.

When I think of what my highlights have been I think of the people I have been lucky enough to work with. The relationships I’ve forged. The friendships I’ve made. For me, it’s the people. And what am I looking forward to? Well I’m looking forward to writing and directing more. I’m really excited by this shift and exploring my own creativity. I’m looking forward to nurturing my own ideas more and balancing that with my acting career.

AFI | AACTA: If you had to name three mentors, who would they be?

Matthew Moore: I actually love the idea of having a mentor. Whilst I haven’t really had an official mentor, I have been lucky enough to have people champion me and I have very talented and supportive friends. So, I have to mention more than three. Two of my closest friends happen to be writer/directors, which has been very handy as I move into this area.

Michael Petroni wrote and directed Till Human Voices Wake Us and has been working as a writer in Hollywood for many years, having written such films as: The Rite, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of Dawn Treader and Queen of the Damned. Michael was the first person I pitched Julian too and he encouraged me to write it just as I had pitched it. As Michael is now spending more time in Australia, it’s been great to bounce ideas off him, read each other’s scripts and get his advice.

Tony McNamara, who wrote and directed The Rage in Placid Lake and has written a prolific amount of television including Tangle, Love My Way and The Secret Life of Us, has also been great to bounce ideas off. More importantly, he also makes a delightful roast lamb with baked vegetables.

Steven Soderbergh was great when I told him I was planning on writing and directing my first short film. He gave me a fantastic reading list along with a list of films to watch for their various filmmaking aspects. There were some for editing, writing, cinematography (colour and black and white) and of course for directing. So, I’ve been devouring all of that.

John Bell has certainly been the most supportive and nurturing in regards to my acting career. He has given me many opportunities to play some of the great character roles in Shakespeare.

Annie Swann is a wonderful acting coach for both stage and screen and has been great to work with over the years.

My wife, Genevieve Hegney, insists she is both my muse and mentor. She has certainly been incredibly supportive and is, of course, the first person I bounce ideas off.

Finally, I often think about the late Nick Enright, writer, director, actor and extraordinary teacher. I was lucky enough to work with Nick in my 2nd and 3rd year at WAAPA and to this day, I still carry his wisdom and generosity with me.

AFI | AACTA: What advice would you give upcoming Australian filmmakers wanting to break into the industry?

Matthew Moore: Create something. There really isn’t any excuse these days. The technology is just so accessible. Julian was made for $7000. We didn’t receive any funding. We raised the money through a quiz night and through the generosity of friends and colleagues who either contributed their time, expertise or money. During the festival run, we’ve been competing against some films with budgets of over $150,000 but the great thing about short filmmaking is that it’s all about the strength of an idea. If you’ve got an idea, grab a 5D camera and make it. Create something.

AFI | AACTA: What is your all time favourite Australian film? Why?

Matthew Moore: I have to mention a few…The first Australian film I remember really having an impact on me in my youth was Peter Weir’s Gallipoli. Gallipoli is clearly an important part of our history that continues to define us and somehow Peter tapped into that in a profound way. I remember someone making the observation that the film was just as beautiful as the letters and poetry that the diggers would send back to their loved ones. Peter Weir is one of the top filmmakers working in the world today. His body of work is incredible.

Proof is one of my all time favourite Australian films. I love a writer/director with a unique voice. Jocelyn Moorhouse created an intimate, funny and moving film about trust. What a great pitch line it must have been… “Well, there’s this blind photographer…”

I also clearly remember the first time I saw Romper Stomper, from writer/director Geoffrey Wright. I had never seen Australia portrayed like that before, it was like a slap in the face. What I remember most from this film is the energy with which it was made and the power of the three main performances. Daniel Pollock, Jacqueline McKenzie and Russell Crowe.

Honourable mentions go to the Ausploitation films Razorback and Patrick for freaking me out and haunting my 10-year-old mind.

AFI | AACTA: Thank you for sharing your time with us.

Burning Man: Jonathan Teplitzky

Writer-director Jonathan Teplitzky and 'Burning Man' lead actress Bojana Novakovic.

When Jonathan Teplitzky burst onto the scene with his first feature, Better Than Sex (2000), he was that rare phenomenon: an Australian writer-director unafraid of exploring the messy, funny and serious side of urban sexual relationships. For that film he was nominated for an AFI Award for Best Direction and Best Original Screenplay. Now, eleven years later, he’s pushing boundaries again with Burning Man, the story of Tom, a bad-boy Bondi chef played by Matthew Goode, who is  reckless, angry, promiscuous and slightly dangerous. As the father of an eight-year-old boy (a great performance by Jack Heanly), Tom is less than responsible, and the many women in his life aren’t at all pleased. The mystery behind the misbehaviour is slowly revealed through a skilfully fragmented narrative that is, again, sexy, funny, sad and honest.

Teplitzky proved he could do comedy and action with the hilarious Gettin’ Square (2003) – a film for which he was also nominated for an AFI Award for Best Direction, though that film was scripted by Chris Nyst. With Burning Man, however, Teplitzky is back to his own script, and mining his own life experiences for a story of grief, desire, memory and love.

Here Teplitzky talks about his creative decisions, including his choice to use a non-linear narrative structure and his striving to capture a ‘winter look’ Bondi. He also talks about his desire to create Australian films for intelligent grown-ups. On a lighter note, he also discusses the absence of dead kangaroos in his film!

Matthew Goode in 'Burning Man'.

Matthew Goode gives a searing performance in 'Burning Man'.

AFI: You’ve been doing a whole lot of Q&A screenings for Burning Man. What are the most common questions you get asked? Are there some surprises?

Jonathan Teplitzky: There have been some good questions. I mean, it’s not surprising, but because there’s a certain biographical element to the story, people are always intrigued and want to know how much is from my own life. Another good one someone asked me was: “If I saw someone behaving like Tom in real life, would I intervene?” My answer was: “I wouldn’t intervene unless they were about to hurt themselves.” But I would – hopefully – look at what they were going through with a lot of empathy and a lot of camaraderie.

AFI: The film throws the audience right into chaos at the very start of the film. Was that always the intention, to start like that and gradually let the audience work out why the central character is behaving that way?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Yes, I decided on that structure pretty early on. I wanted a structure that reflected Tom’s emotional and psychological state, you know, that kaleidoscope, that fractured life, that life turned upside down. That’s why it’s like it is. I think with films like this, it’s really important to throw the audience in at the deep end. You’ve got to lay out the world that they’re going to live in.

And look, I wanted to make an adult film, you know, for adults. And I think audiences have a great desire not to be led by the hand all the time and not to be spoonfed, but to actually come along and have a cinematic experience that they have to work at a little bit. Hopefully part of the pleasure of watching a film like this is to be part of the process of working it out.

The only rule I wrote to was that in cutting from scene to scene, there had to be an emotional reason in some way, or as often as possible, to go from one scene to another. Either there was an emotional payoff in the next scene, or one emotion led into another, so that they were linked.  The story’s quite straightforward, apart from the fact that it’s all jumbled up, but I really wanted it to be an emotional journey for the audience. And as a result, I felt that that would give the film not only a momentum, but would thrust the audience into the story rather than letting them observe Tom from an emotional distance.

AFI: When the character played by Bojana Novakovic appears, it’s actually quite disorienting. We don’t know who she is. Then there’s this revelations, which is a shock. Is this what you were aiming for?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Very much so. There’s a degree of autobiography in it, you know. My partner passed away 10 years ago. Six years had passed before I started writing the script. I started thinking that it would be great to respond to what I experienced in a creative way. So when I started writing it, I had to serve the fact that it’s a film, so I had to build into it a way of telling the story that would make it dramatic, would keep the audience guessing, would keep the audience engaged in a way. I had this idea that we’d be following this guy and to a certain extent, the audience are judging him, you know. “He’s an arsehole! Why is he behaving like this?” You know, he seems to have a real incendiary personality. And then suddenly, the whole ship seems to turn around and a character is revealed that starts to explain perhaps why he is the way he is.  I think this does a number of things, apart from contextualising his behaviour, but it also suggests that he’s not that unusual. It’s a kind of universal story.

Bojana Novakovic and Matthew Goode in 'Burning Man'.

Bojana Novakovic and Matthew Goode in 'Burning Man'.

AFI: The film has a lot of sex in it. It is adult, like you say, and it’s about a complex relationship between a man and a woman and an ongoing marriage really. That seems to be something we don’t do so much here in Australian cinema.

Jonathan Teplitzky: Yes. Sex and emotion. Margaret Pomeranz has spoken about this quite vocally recently, that we shirk away from sex and emotion, both collectively and individually in Australian cinema. And you know, those are both things that interest me. I mean, most of us in Australia are middle-class, we live in cities. But often, what we see on screen is the exact opposite of that. Rural stories set with sort of isolated characters. I’m very keen to explore the way that we actually live.

AFI: I was just looking through the top box office earners of Australian film today, because Red Dog has moved up the list. I was reading them out to my co-worker in the office and she says: “They’ve almost all got either dancing, singing or animals in them.” And this is true!

Jonathan Teplitzky: It’s so true. And you know, the other thing, someone told me once: not only are an amazing percentage of scripts that get submitted for funding set in rural or outback situations – completely the opposite of the way we live –  but that 75% of them have someone running over a kangaroo! That’s what I heard. Whether that’s true or not, I don’t know, but it’s quite funny really. So I feel a bit left out not having a dead kangaroo in it!

AFI: It would have been a bit hard in Bondi!

Cooking up a storm - Dan Wyllie and Matthew Goode in 'Burning Man'.

Cooking up a storm - Dan Wyllie and Matthew Goode in 'Burning Man'.

Jonathan Teplitzky: Yeah, exactly. It’s probably more likely to be on a menu somewhere in Bondi. But hopefully our industry is producing more complex films now. In the last two years or so there has been a good range of films. And that’s what’s great about something like Red Dog that can do $20 million, but that there’s still an interest in other films that do different things. Hopefully that’s a sign of a maturing culture. It remains to be seen, but hopefully that’s a good sign for our industry.

AFI: Can you talk about the ‘look’ of this film? It has a very particular colour palette. It’s not the traditional look of Bondi with the bright sun and blue sparkly beach.

Jonathan Teplitzky: No, I was really glad to shoot it in winter. I live in Bondi and it’s actually a really fascinating place, visually, in the winter. I wanted a sense of slightly heightened reality because that is what Tom is experiencing. Plus, he works in a kitchen, which is full of all that colourful food. I wanted to shift it away from being purely a naturalistic drama, and I didn’t want it to be overly sentimental. It needed to have colour palette that just was a bit more vibrant.

AFI: In terms of locking down the funding, how important was it to have an actor of international stature like Matthew Goode attached?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Look, it wasn’t the reason we cast him. You know, we cast him because I met him in London and as I got to know him, I realised he would do a great job, but also be committed to the film in a way that he had to be – I mean, he’s in 190 scenes or something, and there’s only three he’s not in. So we needed someone who was up for the physical and emotional challenge. I think we just caught him in a time in his life when he was really ready for that and wanting to do that. And you know, I liked the idea of someone who was an outsider;  it just added to his sense of isolation, without having to articulate that specifically in the script.

Obviously, because he’s becoming a well-known actor, that always helps sell the idea of the film to financiers – the fact that you can cite a bunch of big films that he’s been in. But in saying all that, both Screen Australian and Screen NSW supported the film at script stage very strongly before he was attached. But later, when we were putting the gap financing together, having a name actor certainly helps. And having people like Kerry Fox and Rachel Griffiths, then there’s something for investors to hang their hat on too. It’s about making people feel comfortable about what you’re getting into, financially.

AFI: From a realism perspective, there are a lot of English chefs in Sydney!

Jonathan Teplitzky: Yes! Chefing couldn’t be a more international profession, really. There’s every nationality in the kitchen, particularly here, where the food culture is so big and restaurant culture is so big. And you know, it’s just reflective of all the many cultures cooking food in this country.

AFI: What was the approximate budget of the film?

Jonathan Teplitzky: It was around $7 million.

Asking questions of the audience - the first film poster for 'Burning Man', designed by Jeremy Saunders.

AFI: Can you tell us about the film’s poster/key art? It changed from one design to the other. They’re both really beautiful. Why the change?

Jonathan Teplitzky: It didn’t change. We always had two posters. The first poster, the reflective one, in a sense asks questions of the viewer. And then with the second one, we wanted something that would feed that and be a bit more representative of the film. Also, we wanted it to really ping out of a lightbox in cinemas. And when you put a light behind this later one, it looks really great. They were both done by the same person, Jeremy Saunders, with that idea of being a stepping stone from one to the other.

AFI: Is it true you got your start as a photographer?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Well, I went overseas in the early ’80s and I did a lot of photography while I was traveling. I really got into it. And that sort of led on to being interested in film. By the time I got back to London, in the mid ’80s, I actually went to film school there.

AFI: How long has it been since you last directed a feature? Was the last one Better Than Sex?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Well, Better Than Sex was 2004, so it’s quite a while, six years, six, seven years. In the meantime I’ve done commercials, done a little bit of TV [including television series Spirited] and I had other scripts for features in development, but they never really got to a place that I was happy with.

The later poster for 'Burning Man', also designed by Saunders.

AFI: How do you think you’ve grown as a filmmaker from that last feature project to this one?

Jonathan Teplitzky: Well, I think you can chart a development from Better Than Sex to Gettin’ Square to this one, in terms of confidence and grasp of storytelling in the visual medium. From project to project you just learn so much about working with actors and working with crew.  You gain a great deal of understanding of what your strengths and weaknesses are, what you need to do to get a great performance out of someone – and that has to be tailored to individual actors. Also, I’ve learnt to find ways of enjoying the process as much as possible. That’s a really important part of it. We all spend a huge part of our lives doing this, so it’s great to be actually able to enjoy it!

AFI: Thanks for your time and best wishes with the film. It looks great.

Jonathan Teplitzky: Thank you.  I’m really proud of it, I have to say.

Burning Man is currently in national release.